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Extending the Service Life of Elevators

Posted by Layla on February 14, 2017 (Comments Closed)as , , , ,

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Safety requirements for elevators were first standardized by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (or ASME) in 1921. A17.1, A17.7 and A18.1 code publications are currently the most important requirements dealing with elevators. It is therefore a must to hire technicians who are also experts in these safety standards.

Thus, A17.1 is a popular safety standard concerning not only elevators, but also escalators, dumbwaiters, moving walks and material lifts. The publication sets guidelines regarding the design, construction, and installation of elevators and other conveyances. It also provides details on their testing, operation, inspection, maintenance, and repair.

A17.7 on the other hand, refers to the construction, maintenance, and repair of escalators and their associated rooms and hoistways, when these are located in a building or adjacent to it. Finally, A18.1 is the safety standard for platform lifts and stairway chairlifts intended for the transportation of people with disabilities.

Whatever your elevator repair needs, it is important to hire licensed and experienced technicians who are able to respond as soon as possible, even that same day if need be. Critical situations occur sometimes and being able to count on trained emergency response teams is reassuring.

Aside from customer satisfaction, a proven track record of safety is also essential for all repairs undertaken. Moreover, an elevator company that works closely with several suppliers makes for a quick turnaround.

Typical Florida elevator repairs include replacing the hydraulic cylinder, power unit, main valve, elevator door and door equipment, and motor. Services can also handle upgrades for cosmetic purposes, fixes for hydraulic pressure leaks, as well as any repairs deemed necessary after an inspection.

How long do elevators last

Properly and regularly maintained elevators typically last 20 to 25 years, when they are up for modernization, just like the rest of the building. After this time, one can see an increasing need for service and repairs, but modernization may also occur sooner, within the first 10 to 15 years if the elevator is not properly maintained.

Maintaining or extending the lifespan of your elevator means you can modernize your building when it is more convenient to you instead of having to pay a lot of money out of necessity.

In order to postpone the end of your elevator’s cost effective life, make sure to purchase equipment from a major OEM. However, bear in mind that only a handful of elevator companies are able to service original manufacturer equipment, and as a result, they may decide to raise their monthly maintenance fees.

If electrical switchgear is expected to last 50+ years, other types of equipment are less durable. Thus, the cab interior should be refurbished after a maximum of 15 years, while the elevator call station should be replaced after the same period of time.

The cables, car operating panel, shaft doors, controller and dispatcher need replacing after about 20 years. Somewhat more durable are the hydraulic piston, hoist rails, machinery and electrical wiring that have to be replaced (or in the case of the piston, resleeved) after 25 to 30 years.